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Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Preview — Dragon Soul by Jaida Jones. Danielle Bennett Goodreads Author. During the war between the kingdoms of Volstov and Ke-Han, no fighter could match Rook for sheer arrogance and skill. Only Rook could ride the great dragon Havemercy, whose savagery and bloodlust matched his own.

With the war over, and an uneasy truce b During the war between the kingdoms of Volstov and Ke-Han, no fighter could match Rook for sheer arrogance and skill. With the war over, and an uneasy truce between the two nations, Thom hopes the long-lost brothers can bond on a trip together. But Rook cares only that Havemercy lies scattered in pieces across Ke-Han—and someone is buying up her parts, and those of other fallen dragons. The beasts are dead, but the magic that powered them is not.

And now a Ke-Han agent, a Volstov sorceress, and a group of desert tribesmen are vying to possess that magic and control the future. Get A Copy. Hardcover , pages. Published June 8th by Spectra first published January 1st More Details Other Editions 4.

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Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Feb 24, Kaje Harper rated it liked it Shelves: fantasy. This series started strong, but for some reason this third book failed to grab me in the same way. Part of the problem is that the authors introduce 2 new female POV characters, both with 3-sylable fantasy names beginning with "Ma I enjoyed Thom's sections a lot, but found a few of the plot details hard 3.

I enjoyed Thom's sections a lot, but found a few of the plot details hard to follow. I may still read the next one - there is a fascinating world created here. View all 6 comments. Sep 22, Val Freire rated it it was amazing. I will say off the bat, that if you've read either prequel and decide, three books in, you have qualms with tones and profanity you're a fucking tit. Just a point of fact. Like the books previous, this has a unique, rotating albeit jarring 1st-person POV that pushes the plot forward at a compelling pace.

Tones of prejudices, close-mindedness, homophobia, political agendas, culture clash, magical mayhem run rampant in the series throughout. BUT these amazing things aren't even the plot, this serie I will say off the bat, that if you've read either prequel and decide, three books in, you have qualms with tones and profanity you're a fucking tit. BUT these amazing things aren't even the plot, this series is never so impersonal as that. It's the world building attention to detail that makes us choose to like these people, to want them to win, in this impossible quest, every time, despite whether we actually like the guy or not, that shows real magic!

Rook isn't ill-observant, dumb or lackluster because he's foul-mouthed. His culture is simply different, being that of a 'Mollyrat' and there we have the ugly caricature of classicism in the lovely anti-hero package. He isn't ignorant because he's ill-mannered and illiterate; he is in fact observant, calculating, determined and above all else reliable. Everyone he meets, like him or not, is quick to acknowledge that. In the same respect, Malahide, refined, subtle, and structured Woman of the court, is equally off-putting, dangerous and admired for it.

Something in that craft brings across new and subtle unexplored tones of feminism and craftwork that is delicious, not over played and pays off in ways I hadn't foreseen. And while there are familiar tropes, there is also art in the telling, it feels familiar, not forced, like snuggling into a well-worn quilt only to find it smelling of daisies. I've always loved the fullness of this world. I love revisiting this and in my own selfish head-space I feel like I wouldn't want to push it on my friends because I want to keep the magic all to myself.

Which in itself speaks volumes. Dragonsoul is the third series novel but a direct sequel to Havemercy and features Thom and Rook as pov's in addition to Madoka, a Ke-Han girl form an obscure village that becomes a hardened scavenger and when she finds a powerful magical object in the ruins of the capital, she attracts lots of unwelcome attention and will have to follow a long trek to survive and to Malahide a secret agent and magician of the Esar of Volstov who traded her voice for enhanced magical powers as a young orphan.

Wh Dragonsoul is the third series novel but a direct sequel to Havemercy and features Thom and Rook as pov's in addition to Madoka, a Ke-Han girl form an obscure village that becomes a hardened scavenger and when she finds a powerful magical object in the ruins of the capital, she attracts lots of unwelcome attention and will have to follow a long trek to survive and to Malahide a secret agent and magician of the Esar of Volstov who traded her voice for enhanced magical powers as a young orphan.

While Thom and Rook hear rumors of pieces of Dragons sold on the black market and decide to follow them even in the dangerous desert where Havemercy creator has been exiled by the Esar, Malahide is sent to follow the same rumors by her master The four threads converge as expected and the novel is excellent though again the ending is slightly rushed; a great addition to the series and featuring again great prose and characters, Dragonsoul strong A is highly recommended Dec 21, Clia rated it liked it Shelves: average , glbt , fantasy , gen.

This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. In the past I've praised JaiDani's construction of characters while criticising their sloppy plots, so it's interesting that, in the case of Dragonsoul, I'll be doing the opposite.

First, I'll talk about the plot: I liked it. The action started early and continued until the end, there was a clear goal established for ALL the viewpoint characters except maybe Thom, but he has a default goal--"Get Rook to love me"--anyway, so I'll let it slide and the viewpoints collided in a much more satisfying In the past I've praised JaiDani's construction of characters while criticising their sloppy plots, so it's interesting that, in the case of Dragonsoul, I'll be doing the opposite. The action started early and continued until the end, there was a clear goal established for ALL the viewpoint characters except maybe Thom, but he has a default goal--"Get Rook to love me"--anyway, so I'll let it slide and the viewpoints collided in a much more satisfying way than in previous instalments.

I liked the pacing, I liked the way everything tied together and I liked the resolution for each character excluding one, but I'll get to that. Now, onto what I didn't like so much: the characters. Rook, in my opinion, was the saving grace of Havemercy. When the plot was a shambles, when all the other viewpoint characters were irritating me, Rook kept me sane, for reasons I'll put in my Havemercy review if I ever get around to writing a proper one.

The point is, Rook was an engaging character. There was an appealing edge to him that I think was severely dulled in Dragonsoul. He still swore a lot, yes, and he was still angry all the time, but his fire was gone. And sure, you could say that was a creative choice by JaiDani to illustrate how Havemercy's "death" had affected him, but that doesn't change the fact that my favourite thing about Havemercy was completely absent. Wait, did I say my favourite thing? Scratch that. Rook was my second favourite thing about Havemercy.

My favourite thing was the electrifying sexual chemistry between Rook and his brother Thom. Another thing that was sadly missing from Dragonsoul. I understand JaiDani changed their minds about the relationship between Rook and Thom after writing the first draft of Havemercy, but they weren't very successfull in removing the sexual tension between them and it was one of the best things about Havemercy for me at least, others may have been squicked out or even not noticed it at all. Obviously writing Dragonsoul with the brother dynamic included from the get-go meant no more sexual tension, but that made the book into just another story about brotherly love literal bromance , just with added dragon parts.

So yes, that was something I didn't like. Now let's talk about Malahide. She was confusing, monotonous, and reserved to the point of being unbearably boring. Her ending made no sense and didn't resolve her issues at all. On top of that, the two aspects of her character that I suppose were included to try and make her interesting were handled in a way that left me thinking they shouldn't have been included at all.

She's mute not psychologically, but physically , so what happens within 20 pages of her first appearance? Well, she's given a magical necklace that allows her to talk, of course! What the fuck? In my admittedly limited experience, the whole point of including a differently abled character is to challenge them in the way an abled character could not be challenged, so that it's all the more triumphant and satisfying when the differently abled character achieves their goal.

By giving Malahide a disability but then making so it isn't an obstacle at all in her mission, JaiDani completely glossed over any difficulties faced by the mute community. I just--why? Why not just have her NOT be mute in the first place? This bothered me so much. Know what else bothered me? The transsexual thing. Now don't get me wrong, I know there needs to be more trans characters in the media; I want there to be more trans characters in the media.

And I respect that JaiDani MAY have been attempting that with Malahide--that is, attempting a trans character whose life didn't revolve around being trans. But there's a difference between not having it as the defining character trait and just plain not having it as a character trait at all, and that's what annoys me. It's like announcing a prominent character was gay after the series is over. It's a complete and utter cop-out, and it was what I hated the most about Dragonsoul. As for Madoka, well, I liked her. Her and Badger. And what's-his-name--the desert guy. I would have loved them as viewpoint characters.

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Well, um, that's about it. So, to sum up: the plot was good, the characters blah, and the authors lazy. I enjoyed reading Dragonsoul, hence the 3 stars, but I won't be reading it again anytime soon. Jan 19, Clay Kallam rated it liked it Shelves: sf-fantasy. Jaida Jones and Danielle Bennett base their world at the border between an altered China Ke-Han and Volstov Russia , toss in powerful magicians and a society of the verge of industrialization, and have created a varied and interesting trilogy with a changing cast of characters.

Apr 18, Lindsay rated it liked it Shelves: owned , sci-fi-fantasy , lgbt. I'm a huge fan of the authors, but I have to say that I was quite disappointed by this book. I feel as though they used up the bulk of their ideas on the previous books, and the characters in this one-- even Rook, whom I adore-- felt fairly lackluster.

My main complaint, though, is Madoka, who made me want to pull my hair out after about a page and a half due to her unoriginality in design and general pointlessness. My guess is that the authors felt compelled, after having four narrators in each I'm a huge fan of the authors, but I have to say that I was quite disappointed by this book. My guess is that the authors felt compelled, after having four narrators in each of the previous books, to do the same for this one, but they didn't have four characters up to the task. I'll still buy the next book in the hopes that it's better than this one, but I pray it will be back up to the usual standards and that we won't see Madoka in it!

This feels like a true, and better, sequel to the first book. We follow Rook and Thom as they set out on their journey. Soon thereafter, they discover that someone is collecting and selling dragon parts. Rook's ire is roused and he drags Thom to find the culprit. There is a much better character development in this book - both Rook and Thom rub each other the wrong way, and it's easy to see how Rook's callousness hurts Thom. But they stick together because of their birth, and we end with view spo This feels like a true, and better, sequel to the first book. But they stick together because of their birth, and we end with view spoiler [both of them changing each other and accepting the other for who he is.

And that's great - I loved the slow development of that brotherly relationship. I really liked that scene where Sarah Fleet basically tells Rook that Havemercy is not coming back, and Rook goes out into the sand to grieve - and Thom follows him.

That moment of empathy by Thom really helped. She's a scavenger who gets roped in to hunt the dragon soul, and she's view spoiler [accompanied by Badger, a soldier assigned to watch over her. I loved her grit; she comes from a similar background to Rook. If so, that's great for trans recognition.

I also wonder what her Talent is; the smell thing is obvious, as is her being inexhaustible, but it's not clearly defined? I also liked the hint of a relationship with her and Kalim - but I also enjoyed her practicality about it. I wonder if Sarah Fleet ever found out what happened in the end. Feb 24, Omiai rated it it was ok.

I adored the first book in this series, Havemercy, or at least, I loved the characters of Hal and Royston. When it came to the other characters, Rook and Thom, I tended to glass over those parts, finding the characters a little uninteresting and the war element not so good. So when I got this book and realised that the main story was about those characers, I was a bit disappointed.

But I didn't let it put me off, and read this book, desperate to continue the series.


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Again I found the characters o I adored the first book in this series, Havemercy, or at least, I loved the characters of Hal and Royston. Again I found the characters of Rook and Thom rather boring. Their story this time, however, was much more interesting, so I found that element an improvement. The other 2 new characters in this book, Madoka and Malahide, I also didn't find particularly interesting. The interaction between the two became more interesting as the book went on, but it was very near the end of the book when i started actually liking them.

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This book was a real down point for me in this series. The first and second books Havemercy, Shadow Magic both had characters, stories and interactions that I found interesting and fascinating, but this book the characters just didn't do it for me, and character, as you can probably tell, is very important to me. But the storyline itself was really good. We mainly follow Rook and Thom on a journey to try and find Rook's dragon, Havemercy, and the brutal journey they endure in the process.

So although I didn't enjoy this book as much as the others, the writing style of Jones and Bennett is still fantastic, and don't let my review put you off reading the series, especially the first 2 books, because they are truly wonderful books with mostly wondeful, loveable characters.

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Jun 15, Joanna rated it did not like it. First off I'd like to say a 2. I was mostly disappointed. I found myself skimming or skipping the chapters with the two new characters that I just didn't find engaging at all and was left wanting with the development or rather lack of development of the r First off I'd like to say a 2. I found myself skimming or skipping the chapters with the two new characters that I just didn't find engaging at all and was left wanting with the development or rather lack of development of the relationship between the two brothers.

I felt sympathetic for Thom and increasingly frustrated with Rook, the latter I enjoyed immensely in the first book but in this one Their quest felt rather convoluted and Rook's devotion to even pieces of his metal dragon rather than to his very devoted long lost but now returned brother felt He was such a bastard to Thom for practically the entirety of the book that the minuscule moments of not being a complete jackass didn't really pierce through as I think they were meant to.

All in all, their relationship and the potential it had that grabbed me in Havemercy didn't turn out at all like I hoped it would, in that it really didn't change at all. Rook treating people they had only just stumbled into with more respect than he did his brother made me want to reach through the page and slap him. My conclusion is: Thom deserved better. Dec 08, Kassilem rated it really liked it Shelves: 1-read-books.

I think I may have just been in a 'mood', but I had to push myself to get through the first hundred pages of this book. I say a 'mood' because once I actually got into the book I enjoyed it I have to be a little truthful and confess that I skipped some of the parts that weren't the two men's narratives. I don't think I would have finished it if I'd had to wade through all the other stuff. Selfish of me? Perhaps if I'd read the book at some other time, I could hav I think I may have just been in a 'mood', but I had to push myself to get through the first hundred pages of this book.

Perhaps if I'd read the book at some other time, I could have enjoyed the women's naratives as much. Either way, I'm glad I stuck to it. I'm even more in love with Rook and Thom than before. Dec 30, Andrea Brown Riley rated it it was amazing. Just as good as the previous two! I really enjoyed watching the fleshing out of Rook and Thom's relationship, and the new characters in this was were nice to follow along with.

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But Rook cares only that Havemercy lies scattered in pieces across Ke-Han—and someone is buying up her parts, and those of other fallen dragons. The beasts are dead, but the magic that powered them is not. And now a Ke-Han agent, a Volstov sorceress, and a group of desert tribesmen are vying to possess that magic and control the future.

Shadow Magic. Book 2. Led to victory by its magic-fueled Dragon Corps, Volstov has sent a delegation to its conquered neighbors to work out the long-awaited terms of peace. Among those in the party are the decorated war hero General Alcibiades and the formerly exiled magician Caius Greylace. The hidden truth is that the new emperor is harboring a treacherous secret—and once it is revealed, Alcibiades and Caius may be powerless to stop it. Book 4. Though Adamo is not without friends—the magician Royston and former corpsman Balfour—there is only so much he and his allies can do.

Adamo has been put out to pasture, given a professorship at the University. From the fervor he was devoting to the task, I had to assume that, wherever we were heading, it was certain to be a room full of self-important men, waiting to decide my fate. I normally had nothing against self-importance, but the idea that, at this moment, someone could be settling a sentence upon my head was both disquieting and invasive, as though the private events of my life had all too quickly become public.

I might have considered this fact before involving myself with Arlemagne's heir, but I have always been much cleverer in retrospect. There were certain freedoms allowed to men of the Basquiat—men of privilege and wealth. I wondered if this would help my case. But there were some limits to that freedom for which one couldn't be pardoned. I'd never been at the center of an international incident before. On the periphery, perhaps—skirting around the edges like the proper young madames keen on avoiding puddles in the street—but this time was different. Displease the wrong people, and even your connections can't save you.

Displease the wrong country, and—well, I would find out shortly. I refused to blame Erik. Panic was a natural reaction; it could make you stupid, selfish. I'd seen it often enough. It was a rare man who had the natural proclivity to do the right thing when the wrong one might save him a share in the punishment or blame.

Erik had been young. In his place and at that age, I might well have done the same. This was a lie—I knew even as I thought it—but it was a lie that gave me some comfort. Our carriage halted in front of the Esar's palace: a long, low-ceilinged building of cream and gold. The Provost got out before me and held the carriage door, so I knew that things couldn't be so dire as all that. Still, it was with a sense of slow, settling disaster that I stepped onto the Palace Walk. For the first time in a long while I felt utterly powerless to shape my surroundings.

He tapped me once on the shoulder, then took the lead. I followed him, for I could go no other way. Rook The only reason we got punished the way we did was 'cause th'Esar was spitting mad for too many reasons that had nothing to do with me and what I'd done. All of a sudden and out of nowhere, we were getting slapped with a ruler on the wrist, only there was a whole lot more of a ruckus about it, and it was th'Esar himself instead of some prissy-pants schoolma'am doing the slapping.

I mean, we were all called in—me and the rest of the boys—and lined up on these uncomfortable chairs that smelled of old velvet and dust, and made to wait in this place Balfour his voice reminding us he'd been raised with all the privileges of a thoroughbred bitch said was Punishment's Antechamber. And even I had to admit it: That seemed about right. Nobody said anything to us, just gave us a couple of dark looks before making us wait, no doubt so we could think long and hard about what we'd done. They were scowling at me in particular, seeing as how I'd been the one to do it, and everyone knew.

I wasn't sorry. None of the boys were, either—I could see it in the way they were scowling right back. Th'Esar was just pissed and looking for someone to blame it all on. Because we were having enough trouble with Arlemagne without all this on top of the rest, Ghislain'd said, and Adamo'd just shook his head like maybe he wished he'd been a part of it and maybe he was real glad he hadn't been, and maybe it didn't matter either way since he was called in for it with the rest of us.

The thing was, I didn't know she was married. She wasn't so fine and so sweet-curved as I couldn't've found somebody else—and better—to tickle that night. But she was married to a diplomat, which was what made it so bad, so when I tried to pay her like she was a common whore, she got wild as a wet cat on me, screaming and throwing things and breaking vases. I thought she was a whore, the way she'd tarted herself up, but apparently that was just an Arlemagne's way: powder on everything and too many undergarments, the kind of teasing frippery you only see in Our Lady and which I normally don't have time for.

Her breasts were incredible, though—big and round and soft and warm—and I spent a lot of time letting her know how incredible I thought they were. Even if I did think it was a commercial exchange, she might've been grateful instead of screaming rape all over, like that's what you can do if you're a woman when things go sour and you feel a slight. She called me all kinds of things in her raw-edged Arlemagne voice, all kinds of incredible things I passed on afterward to Magoughin, who collected that kind of talk.

But then all of a sudden there was a diplomat with some ridiculous mustache knocking down our door like he was going to kill us, and I almost had my knife in him, all the boys laughing and whooping it up, when Adamo got his arms round me and dragged me off, both of us cursing up a storm. Jaida Jones - About the author -.